The Facebook makers have kept the site fairly simple, which is a major part of its appeal. Naysayers complain that there’s not enough customiz-ing options, but truthfully, most customizing that takes place on personal web pages these days usually ends up making the pages distracting and difficult to follow. Navigationally, Facebook includes a logon page as the starting point for entering the website. After you pass that, you’re present- ed with a Home page, shown in Figure 1.1, and links to your other pages.

Your other pages include your profile page, a Friends page, and your Inbox. You can easily move between pages by clicking the links at the top of the Facebook page located in the blue navigation bar. The left side of the bar has links to your pages, whereas the right side of the bar offers links to settings, logging out, and a search tool.

FIGURE 1.1 Here’s an example of a Home page on Facebook, where a scrolling news feed appears, along with advertisements and other bits of information.
FIGURE 1.1 Here’s an example of a Home page on Facebook, where a scrolling news feed appears, along with advertisements and other bits of information.

If you scroll to the bottom of any Facebook page, you’ll find links for advertisers, developers, terms of service, help, and more. Also at the bot- tom of the Facebook page is an Applications Bar, which stocks shortcut links to your favorite Facebook apps.
The Home page (see Figure 1.1) is sort of like Grand Central Station for,news about your friends on Facebook. It tracks the ongoing status updates of your friends, published photos and videos, shared links, fan pages they’ve joined, and so forth. All the activities come together on a scroll lable page that’s constantly changing (if you refresh the page, that is). The Home page is where you go to see and be seen on Facebook.

As mentioned previously, the focus in Facebook is on profile pages—the place where you add information about yourself to share with others. Figure 1.2 shows an example of a profile page. A typical profile page includes a picture, a status text box so you can let the rest of the Facebook world know what you’re up to or what you’re thinking, a Wall of activities you’re pursuing and communications from friends, and tabs for accessing other pages and features. For example, to add or edit profile information, you can click the Info tab to view your details and make changes.

FIGURE 1.2 Here’s an example of a profile page on Facebook.
FIGURE 1.2 Here’s an example of a profile page on Facebook.

You can view your friend’s profile pages to check out what they’re doing and what they’re up to on Facebook. The information you see listed on your Facebook pages is always changing based on your activities and the activities of your friends, so be sure to refresh your pages often.

So far, I’ve only described a few of the pages you’ll encounter. There are lots more. Now that you’ve had a brief tour, you’re ready to jump in, right? If you haven’t created an account yet, Lesson 2, “Setting Up a Profile,” shows you how. If you’re already a Facebook member, move onto the other lessons detailing how to use the site and get the most out of your social networking experience. Enjoy!

Post Comment